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Building a stud partition

19th Jan '16 • By Emily Ayers

Whether it’s throwing up a new room, or simply a dividing wall in a larger space, stud partitions are the most common way of building internal, non load-bearing walls. Stud partitions are made out of timber and drywall and are the quickest and easiest way to get a desirable result. With minimal DIY skills, it is possible to build a high quality wall that is straight and smooth, while being sturdy enough to act as an interior wall in your home.

With minimal DIY skills, it is possible to build a high quality wall that is straight and smooth, while being sturdy enough to act as an interior wall in your home.

Partition.jpg

Whether it’s throwing up a new room, or simply a dividing wall in a larger space, stud partitions are the most common way of building internal, non load-bearing walls. Stud partitions are made out of timber and drywall and are the quickest and easiest way to get a desirable result.

But what are the steps to creating stud partitions at home? 

Cutting the Timber

The first thing to do when building a stud partition is to cut the timber. Make a basic frame for your wall out of four pieces – top and bottom, left and right. Fix these in place. Next, you need to cut vertical studs, which should run at 600mm intervals across your wall. You should then adjoin these with horizontal studs, connecting the space between the verticals. These should be intermittently installed at the half way point, then directly above the halfway point, then the half way point etc., in a repeating pattern to provide the optimum strength to your wall.

Preparing Drywall

The next phase is preparing and installing the drywall. Assuming your measurements are correct, you should be able to install full sheets of drywall, and screw them into the studs behind. Each sheet of drywall should have a minimum of 10 screws, running around the perimeter and across the studs in the middle. If you need to cut the drywall, score the front with a straight edge and a knife. The drywall should then fold along the cut, allowing you to cut the paper that holds it together for a clean break.

Preparing-Drywall.jpg

Plaster, Paper and Paint

Once the drywall has been installed, it’s time to plaster, paper or paint over your wall. If you are not plastering, you may want to fill in any screw holes before decoration, for the smoothest possible overall finish.

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